Oculus Acquires The Eye Tribe, Eye-Tracking Startup

Oculus Acquires The Eye Tribe, Eye-Tracking Startup

Facebook looks to up the Oculus ante by investing in eye-tracking technology.

With 2016 coming to a close, it’s time to start looking toward the state of virtual reality in 2017. There’s been a host of exciting announcements in the past week alone, but one of the most notable bits of information was just released yesterday: Oculus has acquired eye-tracking technology developer, The Eye Tribe.logo2_editThe Danish start-up released $99 eye-tracking device developer kits for computers in the past, as well as software that sought to bring ‘gaze-based’ technology to virtual reality and smartphones. Maybe even more excitingly: Eye Tribe developed a rendering system for VR that generates perfect images only in the direction in which each eye is looking. This saves an immense amount of computational power since the system doesn’t have to render the entire virtual world all at one time.  

The company’s cofounder Sune Alstrup explained more about what the technology could do to TechCrunch back in 2014: “This technology can basically go into any kind of device, everything from your smartphone, to your watch, or your car to automatically detect if you’re falling asleep behind the wheel, or in games where you could use your eyes to shoot. This is the kind of technology that’s applied in fighter planes today, it’s million dollar technology that we’re bringing to the mass market.”

Now the company will be bringing this exciting tech to Oculus, hopefully adding a whole new dynamic to the already impressive headset. With Google buying out eye-tracking developer Eyefluence a while back and other companies making similar purchase throughout this past year, 2017 is shaping up to be the year of the gaze. Or year of look? Some, like Joshua Kopstein of The Intercept, have expressed concern over the amount of data VR will generate for companies to mine and exploit. Given Facebook and Google’s respective positions as leading social and information companies, some might take this as a sign to alter or limit their participation in VR.

Guess we’ll see in 2017.

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Sat, 31 Dec 2016 17:00:32 +0000

Accenture’s Top 5 Predictions For What Will Be Hot At CES 2017

Accenture’s Top 5 Predictions For What Will Be Hot At CES 2017

accenture-ces-curran

John Curran

Roughly 177,000 people are expected to converge on Las Vegas next week for the Consumer Electronics Show. CES 2017 will have around 2 million square feet of exhibit space.

John Curran, managing director for communications, media, and tech at Accenture, has come up with his annual predictions of the prevailing themes at CES 2017. I interviewed him about those predictions, which can serve as a guide through the madness. His first big prediction is that artificial intelligence will be huge at the show, thanks to breakthroughs in the past few years that have made AI practical for use in a wide range of consumer services. He also believes intelligent assistants, from Siri to Alexa, will also be hot.

But not all will be rosy. Curran warns that the “insecurity of things” means that consumers won’t trust Internet of Things devices until companies fix the ongoing security problems. Curran also thinks augmented reality and virtual reality will be hot, and that companies that wrap everything up in effective services will win consumers’ hearts. I also spoke with Curran about the big trends at CES 2016.

VentureBeat: What’s your general expectation of CES this year, compared to a year ago?

John Curran: It’s maybe the kickoff of a new wave of innovation. If I look at the big trends that are happening in the industry right now, you have some new technologies that are coming on to the scene that I think have the potential to start a wave that lasts the next couple of years. I’ll be excited to see that.

VB: What’s the first major trend you expect?

Curran: The first wave of innovation I was talking about is artificial intelligence. AI has a chance to be the story of the show this year. It’s a golden thread that will be woven through so many of the technologies that we’re going to see at CES — everything from automotive to robotics to smartphones to health and fitness. I’m excited to see how it manifests itself and permeates the show.

VB: Is that different in that everyone expects these things to work now, whatever’s using AI? In the past it always seemed very futuristic.

Curran: The technology has advanced. If you look at what you have now as a convergence of big data and analytics, machine learning, natural language processing, ubiquitous connectivity — all these things come together. You have an opportunity for device manufacturers and companies who are building services to run on those devices to leverage AI and create much easier-to-use, much more intuitive and natural customer interfaces. They can create a compelling set of new services that solve people’s everyday, pragmatic challenges and problems.

VB: What are some of the gadgets that you think will get better through AI? Everybody talks about self-driving cars, but what other variety do you see?

Curran: It runs the gamut. Automotive is certainly a spot where AI is going to be shown prominently. Smartphones have gotten better. People are used to intelligent assistants built into smartphones now. You’re going to see health and fitness devices incorporate AI, helping people come up with better exercise regimens, reminding them to take their medicine. Across the show you’ll see different companies experimenting with different executions of AI.

VB: Have you thought about who the leaders in the space might be?

Curran: In the self-driving car space we’ve had a number of companies come out and test that technology. When you think about things like intelligent assistants, we have embedded services like Siri from Apple, Google Home, Amazon Echo with Alexa. A number of big platform players are coming into the space and starting to do interesting things with both embedded AI and AI devices like the assistants.

VB: Trend number two you said was intelligent assistants. Can you explain more about that as far the distinction with AI?

Curran: Intelligent assistants are a manifestation of AI, but they’re devices or services that leverage both AI and natural language processing to help people control the devices in their homes or engage with services. It’s the ability to use voice commands and stream your music or control the temperature in your house. Set up reminders to get to your next appointment on time. These intelligent assistants create an easy-to-use interface that takes a lot of the hard work out of our everyday lives. They simplify a very frantic and hectic lifestyle by doing the routine tasks that we need to get done.

One thing on intelligent assistants that will be interesting to watch at the show is the degree to which they’re becoming platforms. We’ve had a number of new devices come to the market over the last couple of years that haven’t quite taken off in the mainstream yet. Some early success with early adopters, but the IOT devices and some of these connected devices — people have found the devices themselves to not be as intuitive or easy to use as they were hoping.

Intelligent assistants create a new user interface that allows people to take advantage of all these great devices and innovations we’ve had over the last couple of years in an easier, more obvious way. One thing to watch will be the number of joint announcements and ecosystem announcements we get at CES where the intelligent assistant companies and platforms are competing to create a rich ecosystem and an immersive set of consumer experiences.

VB: Your third trend is the “insecurity of things.” That seems to run counter to some of what you’ve talked about. AI may work, but there could be big security holes in it.

Curran: The Internet of Things is an interesting challenge right now. You have all these new connected devices coming on that have the potential to make everyday life that much better, richer, easier, more secure. But they come with some challenges. Companies have a tension in their designs. They’re trying to make these devices easy and simple to use, easy and simple to set up and connect, but in doing so many of them have put no security in place, or hard-coded passwords in place, and these devices are easy to hack.

That creates two different security threats. It’ll be interesting, at CES, to see how companies talk about addressing those threats. The first threat is more toward the back end. It’s the behind-the-scenes security threat. Hackers are able to access these devices and then use, say, home security cameras to launch a denial-of-service attack on a website. That’s already happened. We’re seeing widespread calls, including from the Department of Homeland Security, for improved security measures to close some of the vulnerabilities these devices are creating.

The second security angle, the more consumer-facing one, is the fact that these IOT devices bring consumer concerns about security and privacy from the online world into the real world. If you think about the last 18 months, security and privacy have moved from a tech-pages conversation to a front-page conversation. Consumers have seen this in some of their favorite retailers being hacked, personal data being stolen. They’ve seen celebrity photos hacked. The latest election cycle brought conversations about hacking almost every day. This has moved to the fore as far as top-of-mind awareness among consumers.

When they look at the IOT devices, the interesting vulnerability these create is that they take that concern into the home, into tangible settings. That home security camera I installed in the house to improve my security, if it’s hacked — someone now has a live feed from inside my home. Talk about an invasion of privacy. The home thermostat that has AI behind it so it can predict when I’m home and adjust the temperature so the house is always comfortable and the heating bill stays low, someone hacks that information and now they know about my physical comings and goings. They know when the house is vacant.

These IOT devices create tremendous consumer benefit, but they’ve opened up new security concerns that companies need to address for these devices to explode into mainstream adoption. When companies resolve that tension between ease of setup, ease of use, and ongoing manageability of security settings, that will go a long way toward driving adoption of these new connected devices.

VB: You’ve just described the plot of Ubisoft’s Watch Dogs 2 video game. One idea proposed in the fiction there is that some security vulnerabilities are intentional — that companies want to get access to personal information and use it or sell it. There’s an element of paranoia in the conversation at this point.

Curran: One thing we’ve seen, a trend starting last year and I think a trend still this year, is the whole move toward greater empowerment of the consumer when it comes to their security and privacy. The companies that, in the long term, will be the most successful are those that create real transparency as far as what data’s being collected, how it’s being collected, with whom it’s being shared and when. Giving consumers an easy-to-use interface to control those decisions and make sure they’re aware of the trade-offs they’re making.

Many consumers are willing to trade a certain amount of personal information for a defined benefit. If you’re making my life easier, if you’re providing me a richer set of services that I find valuable, I may be willing to trade information. It’s when consumers feel like they haven’t been told or that they weren’t aware that companies violate a trust, and beyond that point it’s so hard to win consumers back.

B: Do companies seem to be aware of this challenge as far as security?

Curran: Last year was the first year I can recall where security was a big story at CES. We saw a large number of companies at the show talking about the security of the devices they had just introduced. Other companies were talking about additional services and security capabilities they were bringing to market that would make existing devices in people’s lives more secure. Last year was the coming-out party, if you will, for security as a story at CES, and I think this year that trend continues and accelerates.

VB: Your fourth trend is the rise of augmented reality and virtual reality.

Curran: Last year was also the first year we really saw VR come to the fore with commercially available products at CES. This year, as I look at CES, I anticipate a year of innovation and experimentation when it comes to VR. Companies are going to be looking at how they can create richer, more immersive consumer experiences. I’ve seen companies experimenting with how to move beyond VR visuals to other senses. Can they bring in things like touch and smell? I’ve seen micro-heaters and micro-coolers, even water misters, trying to create an immersive experience. What will be interesting at the show is seeing which of these experiments excite the consumer and capture the imagination, and which ones miss the mark. It’ll be a fascinating show when it comes to VR.

The other thing for VR that I’m particularly watching at CES is the degree to which the media and content players show up. What announcements do we get about new media deals and content becoming available on VR? We recently saw the NBA announce that they would broadcast games in VR. As you get new content like that on the market, it attracts a whole new set of users, excites a new fanbase, and gets people interested in adopting the technology.

VB: For VR I’m not sure where it is on the hype curve. It grew to something like a $2.7 billion industry in 2016, but it’s far below some expectations as far as the number of units going out the door.

Curran: Like I say, this was the first full-fledged year where we see VR moving into mainstream, commercially available products. I’m excited about the early results we’ve seen. Now one of the challenges for VR is getting enough exciting and compelling content to attract not just the tech enthusiast, but the mainstream customer. That becomes a critical component as people look at VR as marketing and VR as an entertainment platform, be it for games or video or other content. As the platforms become more pervasive, it becomes more compelling for content producers to think about how to exploit this and reach new customers or delight existing customers in a new way. That’s the next step for expanding the VR market.

VB: A couple of different parties launched into the market. Facebook has Oculus. Valve and HTC have the Vive. One of them is an open platform and the other is closed. I wonder to what extent companies in the ecosystem care about that. Do they want to be in the camps of the major platform owners, or do they want it all to be open? What about across all the tech platforms, not just VR?

Curran: If you look at it over time, we’ve had successful examples of both. The reality in the tech industry, if people are able to create compelling consumer experiences, open platforms have done well and closed platforms have done well. Back in the day Windows and Microsoft had a very open platform that did extremely well. Apple historically has been more closed and done extremely well. We see companies being able to adopt both strategies.

The real key is, can you develop the right consumer experiences that attract enough people to your platform that it becomes the platform all developers feel they have to target when they’re bringing content to market? This becomes one of those virtuous cycles when it’s done well. The network effect kicks in. The more people are on the platform, the more developers want to target it. The more developers bring content, the more people want to join the platform.

The key for companies establishing these platforms is kicking off that cycle. How do I excite the early enthusiasts and translate their enthusiasm to broader-based adoption by mainstream customers? As that cycle picks up, it takes on a life of its own. It’s early days now as to which becomes the winning formula within VR, but either approach could work. It comes down to who’s winning the hearts and minds of early customers and translating those customers into ambassadors who propel their brands and platforms forward.

VB: It almost seems like every platform owner has to be in every one of the things you’ve talked about. They don’t want to be dependent on somebody else’s significant piece of the platform.

Curran: When you look at the platforms themselves — again, just look back over the history of tech. Some platforms are more narrowly targeted. Some are much more pervasive in their scope and magnitude. We’ve seen consumers adopt what I would call more fit-for-purpose types of experiences and devices, platforms that are more single-focused, things that solve an everyday need. People look at them and think, “I have to have that.” But we also see companies that take a very broad-based approach. They’re going to create a more pervasive platform with more general capabilities that touches many more aspects of people’s lives. There’s a built-in utility to having a common interface, a common way of interacting, a simplified set of fewer devices in my life that allow me to do many things.

It’s tough to say exactly which formula will work without looking at how people are approaching this from the customer’s perspective. How are platforms winning hearts and minds? I so often think it comes down to just a few emotional needs you have to solve. There’s that “oh, wow” moment, where consumers move from an awareness that the technology exists to an excitement about its potential. Then they move from that enthusiasm to confidence. Are the companies able to instill confidence that that potential can be realized? And not only realized, but realized in my life. “I can use this. This is the right technology for me.” Companies that are able to seamlessly move consumers through those emotional needs are the ones that gain traction and pick up momentum in the market.

VB: Your last trend was services. What do you mean by that?

Curran: This builds on many of the themes we’ve been talking about so far. We’ve seen many of the hardware companies extend their reach into services. They’re looking to differentiate not just on hardware alone, but the rich sets of consumer experience that hardware enables.

I think back to CES 10 years ago. So much of what I saw was excitement about the latest specs. It was the biggest this, the smallest that, the fastest whatever. Those were the stories that resonated out of the show. We’ve moved in many cases beyond talk about specifications and much more into what value the devices and services deliver in people’s lives. What comes of this is you see traditional hardware companies moving into services and having more of their conversation be about the services.

The nice thing about this is it allows for more points of differentiation. Companies can find more points of innovation. Done right, the innovation is mutually reinforcing. The new services require new hardware. Consumers upgrade to buy a new device and take advantage of all the capabilities in the service. As new devices come out with enhanced capabilities like new sensors, those create white space to develop rich, immersive consumer experiences that are differentiated. You’re starting to see more companies playing on both sides of that equation as an opportunity to differentiate themselves in the market.

VB: Anything else you’d like to add about the show?

Curran: I’m very excited for CES this year. I’m always looking forward to that next thing that’s going to amaze us. That’s one of the joys of working and spending time in this industry. It moves fast and it moves in unexpected ways. CES is a great opportunity where you have the whole industry coming together. I can’t wait to be surprised by something I never thought about, but that becomes so intuitively obvious when someone does a great job of innovating.

This post by Dean Takahashi orignally appeared on VentureBeat.

Tagged with:

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Sat, 31 Dec 2016 18:00:53 +0000

World War Toons (PSVR)

World War Toons (PSVR)



“…it has actually all the correct components to make an excellent on line multiplayer shoot’em up.”


Age Rating: 12+
Review program: PlayStation VR
Price at Time Of Evaluation: Free
Comfort Rating: Red
Genre: Shoot ‘Em Up
Size: 1.7 GB
Controller program: Gamepad
Best using Position: Sitting
Multi Player: No


World War Toons (PSVR)


Introduction: World War Toons BETA does first-person shooters as you’ve never seen: WWII action plus a boatload of wackiness, completely free-to-play and made for VR. It’s Axis vs. Allies, sharks vs. yetis, and tanks leaping through the air! Throw on a VR headset to travel throughout the chart and leap in to the activity! And if you’re not here however, no perspiration – we’re totally playable in your non-VR flat screens, too. World War Toons is headed the right path! Toon in.

Review: World War Toons could be the cartoon exact carbon copy of Call of Duty, just crazier and packed with strange and wonderful things.You start-off with a pretty cool menu hosted in an airplane this is certainly flying along, providing you with an atmosphere that you are starting battle. With this BETA you probably have only an internet fast match and Playground alternative, be cautioned the online multiplayer is quite buggy and it’ll simply take quite a while getting a match started. There are numerous in-app-purchases to help make, therefore why the game is free. That might really alter prior to the game is fully launched, but also for today, that is the situation.

There are four classes of fighter to select from. A Sniper, Machine Gun, Pistol and Rocket Launcher, every one has actually it’s very own merits and utilizing the earned in-game credit or making a purchase, you can personalise each fighter. When the match starts it really is basically a free-for-all. What you will dsicover irritating this is actually the dying cutscene, that you will see a lot of during the early games. Each and every time being forced to select one cup of soldier again and solve a mini-puzzle of sorts. You will spend more timing doing that than in fact playing the overall game. Fortunately it has all correct components in order to make outstanding internet based multiplayer shoot’em up. It also has most of the classic online game settings like deathmatch, capture the banner, and some really funny powerups to gather one with may be the capacity to allow it to be rain pianos! But at present it however requires longer inside development range.oven.





Verdict: World War Toons is an often complicated, but fun online game to play, but unfortunately not in VR. If it is not the movement that complete you off, it will be the undeniable fact that it doesn’t really help. You will do much better playing this game on the normal television display. At the end of your day, this game remains in Beta and it is certain to come to be better in the future. But at present it is preferable averted if you don’t really want to view it operating in VR.

Buy World War Toons Now

Related Articles

This short article passed through the Full-Text RSS solution – should this be your content and also you’re reading it on another person’s site, kindly read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely fake.

Published at Sat, 31 Dec 2016 11:57:45 +0000

New Oculus Rift And Gear VR Releases For The Week Of 12/25/16

New Oculus Rift And Gear VR Releases For The Week Of 12/25/16

Shhh, do you hear that? It’s the sound of silence. There’s very, very little to report on this week, as the Oculus and Gear stores have all but closed their doors for Christmas, instead focusing on their ongoing — and nearly over — Winter Sales. We do have a few things to highlight though from Steam, which has thrown a few bones to people desperate for new content. No new Gear VR releases that we could find, however.

If you missed last week, you can see those new releases here. And don’t forget that UploadVR has a Steam community group complete with a curated list of recommendations so that you don’t have to waste any money finding out what’s good in the world of VR.

Plus — check out our list of the best Oculus Rift games and best Gear VR games for more suggestions!

Neon8, from GameDevCoop
Price: $4.99 (Rift)

Here’s a stylish sci-fi 6DOF shooter for those that are enjoying the genre’s revival in VR. Tour the multiverse and blast away alien bugs that threaten Neon8. It’s an arcade-inspired experience that will appeal to old-school gamers.

Recommendation: Something to check out for fans of Descent, perhaps.

Deathlike: Awakening, from Cybreath
Price: $7.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

Nothing gets us in the festive feeling like a bit of survival horror. You’re alone in the woods at night, and you’ve got to survive the terrors that wait in the dark. If you’re squeamish when it comes to horror, we wouldn’t recommend this one.

Recommendation: Only for those that like this VR horror as intense as possible.

LightVR, from MyDream Interactive
Price: $13.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

The full release of LightVR brings personal spaces to the VR productivity app. It has several interesting twists, like the ability to use the passthrough camera to see where you’re typing on a keyboard. It’s a little late to the party but still worth checking out for those interested.

Recommendation: One for those that want to work within VR at this early stage.

Ziggy’s Chase, from phime studio
Price: $12.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

The description for Ziggy’s Chase reads: “Never mind the plumber, the hedgehog is coming to Steam!” I think Sega might take an issue with that; Ziggy is a decidedly slower hedgehog that still runs around zones that look identical to a Sonic or Mario game. VR support is optional.

Recommendation: Look for something with a little more originality instead. Mervil’s is a decent options.

Wave Magic VR, from Overrun Games
Price: $5.99 (Rift)

An early access release of another game that lets you step into the shoes of a wizard. This one lets you try out Leap Motion controls as well as the usual position-tracked and gamepad options. Use them to explore a world and take down mythical beasts.

Recommendation: One for the wizards, Harry.

Primal Carnage: Onslaught, from Pub Games
Price: $20.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

This is a spin-off of the Primal Carnage series, which has been offering dinosaur-fighting survival games since 2012. As you’d expect, it’s a wave-based shooter in which you fight off hordes of pre-historic beasts.

Recommendation: It’s another wave shooter without much depth for the price tag. Wait on a huge sale or more content.

Offroad: VR, from bcInteractive

Price: $7.19 (Rift, Currently discounted)

Racing games and VR go together like peanut butter and jelly. They compliment one another and play off of each other’s strengths. Offroad: VR is a game that doesn’t try to complicate things too much and instead just revels in the fact that it lets you drive around an open world while you go offroading.

Recommendation: If you like racing in VR but aren’t a fan of structured tournament-style tracks, this could scratch your itch. 

Tagged with: , , , , ,

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Sat, 31 Dec 2016 00:00:33 +0000

New HTC Vive Releases For The Week Of 12/26/16

New HTC Vive Releases For The Week Of 12/26/16

Though Christmas is over, that hasn’t stopped devs from putting together one of the better themed offerings in Nick. The game is a defensive shooter with various weapons you can grab for Vive, the ability to fortify your dwelling, and some impressive visuals all for free. It’s a light week for releases but, even though we don’t quite recommend it yet, The Dawn: First War could be an interesting evolution of MMORPGs in VR, something that has yet to find footing. Don’t forget that Steam’s Winter Sale and Oculus’ as well are both still going on.

In the meantime, if you missed last week, you can see those new releases here. And don’t forget that UploadVR has a Steam community group, complete with a curated list of recommendations so that you don’t have to waste any money finding out what’s good in the world of VR.

We also have a top list of the absolute best HTC Vive games — which is updated every few months with the latest and greatest options.

Offroad: VR, from bcInteractive

Price: $7.19 (Rift, Currently discounted)

Racing games and VR go together like peanut butter and jelly. They compliment one another and play off of each other’s strengths. Offroad: VR is a game that doesn’t try to complicate things too much and instead just revels in the fact that it lets you drive around an open world while you go offroading.

Recommendation: If you like racing in VR but aren’t a fan of structured tournament-style tracks, this could scratch your itch. 

Primal Carnage: Onslaught, from Pub Games
Price: $20.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

This is a spin-off of the Primal Carnage series, which has been offering dinosaur-fighting survival games since 2012. As you’d expect, it’s a wave-based shooter in which you fight off hordes of pre-historic beasts.

Recommendation: It’s another wave shooter without much depth for the price tag. Wait on a huge sale or more content.

vrsnowballs

VR Snowballs, from Zabuza Labs

Price: $4.49 (Currently Discounted)

Though Christmas has come and gone, the winter themed content continues. VR Snowballs doesn’t have you throwing snowballs as you’d expect but, instead, shooting the flying spheres of ice as you move up the leader-boards throughout 30 levels.

Recommendation: You can find better and deeper casual shooters for the price — even Winter-themed ones.

Space Badminton VR, from Shashitha Kularatna

Price:$4.49 (Currently Discounted)

Your hand-eye coordination will be tested as you engage in the badminton sport while in outer space. Along with the wonderful view, you’ll be able to use jet packs to get a leg up on your AI opponent.

Recommendation: Solid fun that will hopefully add more content over time.

thedawn

The Dawn: First War, from Interactive Technology Co., Ltd

Price: $9.99

The Dawn: First War is an MMORPG, one of the genres still trying to find footing in the VR ecosystem. Play as a pioneer in this new world and discover the history of the ruins and underground city.

Recommendation: Be cautious. There’s potential here but elements need work.

Wave Magic VR, from Overrun Games
Price: $5.99 (Rift)

An early access release of another game that lets you step into the shoes of a wizard. This one lets you try out Leap Motion controls as well as the usual position-tracked and gamepad options. Use them to explore a world and take down mythical beasts.

Recommendation: One for the wizards, Harry.

Ziggy’s Chase, from phime studio
Price: $12.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

The description for Ziggy’s Chase reads: “Never mind the plumber, the hedgehog is coming to Steam!” I think Sega might take an issue with that; Ziggy is a decidedly slower hedgehog that still runs around zones that look identical to a Sonic or Mario game. VR support is optional.

Recommendation: Look for something with a little more originality instead. Mervil’s is a decent options.

naughty

Naughty Or Nice, from VR Junkies

Price: Free To Play

Another Christmas themed experience and this time you’re helping to prepare for the holiday. Load gifts into Santa’s sleigh using a candy cane slingshot.

Recommendation: Late to the Christmas party a bit, but still free fun.

Psyche Soldier VR, from Single Step Games, LLC

Price: $13.49 (Currently Discounted)

This wave shooter pits you against a wave of demonic characters in a psychedelic setting. Face your own subconscious in the form of enemies inspired by fear, shame, and more.

Recommendation: Interesting concept with poor execution and flat visuals. Pass.

tornuffalo

Tornuffalo – BuffalSnow Blizzard, from RealityRig

Price: Free To Play

This new DLC for the wild experience that is Tornuffalo adds asymmetric multiplayer gameplay for owners of the base game.

Recommendation: Free and must-have addition.

laststand

Last Stand, from Interactive Technology Co., Ltd

Price: $2.99

Last Stand is a wave shooter against gross and brutal looking creatures. The game switches things up a bit by adding a teleport mechanic as well, which most wave shooters aren’t incorporating into their apps at all.

Recommendation: Solid fun for the price. Could use a bit more content, but it’s a great value.

Orc Hunter VR, from Orc Hunter Developer Team

Price: $8.49 (Currently Discounted)

This epic VR action game features the freedom of roomscale dodging to take down Orcs with your sword (and optional shield), mace, or bow. Includes online multiplayer.

Recommendation: Keep an eye on it in Early Access.

VR Escape Room: Alcatraz, from OriginsVR

Price: $5.09 (Currently Discounted)

In this room escape experience you not only need to gather resources to escape, you must learn about your own life from the notes left behind as well.

Recommendation: One of the best room escape experiences available yet. Grab it.

nick

Nick, from Mike Bourbeau, Ron White, and Matt Modaff

Price: Free

Nick is quite possibly the definitive Christmas themed title, flipping jolly old St. Nick into a gun totting and tatted up protagonist for this defense shooter. Board up windows and grab whatever tools you can find to shoot down the assailants.

Recommendation: Absolute must-have for the holidays and any slight bugs should be knocked out in Early Access.

snow

Christmas Massacre VR, from AndAll Interactive

Price: $2.00 (Currently Discounted)

What happens when the snowmen get hostile? Christmas Massacre VR drops you into such a scenario with a choice of weapons to help you survive the ordeal.

Recommendation: Not worth paying money for, we’d pass.

Clazer, from SynapticSwitch, LLC

Price: $17.99 (Currently Discounted)

Clazer is a simulation that provides a space to train in the art of sport shooting with realistic physics and tech that teaches how to lead your target.

Recommendation: Pricey, but it’s intended as a legit simulation. If you have any interest in the sport, it’s worth considering.

LightVR, from MyDream Interactive
Price: $13.99 (Rift, currently discounted)

The full release of LightVR brings personal spaces to the VR productivity app. It has several interesting twists, like the ability to use the passthrough camera to see where you’re typing on a keyboard. It’s a little late to the party but still worth checking out for those interested.

Recommendation: One for those that want to work within VR at this early stage.

Tagged with: , , , ,

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Sat, 31 Dec 2016 00:15:36 +0000

‘Unearthed Inc: The Lost Temple’ Review

‘Unearthed Inc: The Missing Temple’ Evaluation

Unearthed Inc: The Lost Temple is a problem adventure game that puts you within the shoes of a fresh recruit to a resource searching business. With telekinetic capabilities and an obligatory wise-cracking robot sidekick known as Droid, you venture deeply to the Amazonian forest in search of the fabled Dragoon Egg. Below is a magical adventure that often times could be favorably breathtaking, and also at other times hopelessly exasperating.


Unearthed Inc Details:

Official Site
Developer:
 Glo Inc

Available On: Steam (Vive, Rift), Oculus Residence (Rift)
Coming Soon: PlayStation VR, Google Day Dream
Reviewed On: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
Release Date: December 16th, 2016


Gameplay

Frequently in adventure games you’re end up led by the hand by a sarcastic robot just who lets you know for which you have to go and that which you have to do when you are getting truth be told there. Even though the trope is pretty ideal for padding on a game’s narrative as well providing you course, it sometimes leave a fairly sour style in my own lips after a few years. I love checking out and figuring things from my own, and after playing countless games with drifting robot friends tagging along, I’ve come to the conclusion that I’d rather be frustrated with a game than swept through it by an overzealous robo-nanny.

unearthed-robotThat’s Droid! He’ll be around all week, folks.

In Unearthed Inc your side-kick Droid is helpful, robotic and sarcastic, yes, but he also fortunately stays from the company if you like him to. Glancing at him quickly will signal you would like a tip from him, which he’s all too happy to produce at no penalty, you could otherwise let him jabber to himself as you you will need to determine where to get the second little bit of the puzzle.

SEE USUALLY

Oculus Touch Assessment: Reach into Rift

Through the new found telekinetic capabilities, you can easily effortlessly tractor-beam items straight to your available hand and ‘force push’ them at enemies and particular puzzles. It’s sorts of youth dream become more active, and getting the hang of magnetically tractoring a weapon or item to my hand quickly became second nature, and mostly works as it should. More about that later.

Puzzles – if you’re not into fetch quests, then you can feel some resentful whatsoever the mechanical gears, secrets, alongside wiggly-bits you must gather and bung into place, which occasionally are kept in under most likely places. Oftentimes I would personally turn to spamming Droid to have an idea where in fact the next piece had been simply because of how obscure the answer would inevitably turn out to be. Just who knew the only thing to knock-down a mushroom had been a bottle of poison? We yes as hell didn’t.

unearthed-puzzlematching problem to start a door

To break within the pretty much 2 time problem adventure, there are some not-so-easy boss battles that really bring your physicality into play, something that ended up being fantastically unanticipated and a nice vary from the normal humdrum of puzzles and slice scenes. Dodging fireballs, dynamite, and energy orbs from numerous baddies—all headed directly for the face, mind you— while you must shoot back with whatever’s readily available truly receives the blood pumping. Moreover it lets you launch several of that frustration you have accumulated knocking through puzzles—puzzles that sometimes believed too obscure and disconnected from my evident goal that whenever finally arrive at a boss struggle, you’re ready to blast basically everything with a rock into face.

SEE ALSO

New Oculus Touch Qualities Detailed in Hottest Oculus Computer SDK 1.6 Release

The story is somewhat poor and is commonly an easy ‘find the one thing because… you simply gotta’ quest, a number of which is often forgiven as a result of what I believed had been a smorgasbord method of enjoyment: provide a little bit of every thing and hope some thing sticks. Also to their credit, many it performed.

Immersion

If you perform in line with the game’s unwritten guidelines, in other words. don’t video through wall space, don’t spot things when you look at the wrong spots, don’t attempt to use the wrong item for incorrect purpose—you may feel the maximum amount of existence in Unearthed as virtually any standing room-scale game. While both well-rendered and really vocals acted, the uncomfortable facts are that the game’s item interaction is simply too harsh and inconsistent becoming undoubtedly immersive.

Throwing things in VR is not effortless, because you don’t have the same physical comments cues like body weight and size which help you learn when you should release an item hitting a target accurately. Even though you can telekinetically ‘shoot’ any item within hand, you can’t precisely put an arc on it like you would, say if you had a need to get an orb into a cup or a log into a fire gap. At times i might be absolutely baffled why the I happened to be having to try out a second price carnival online game to move forward inside narrative.

Unearthed Inc additionally is suffering from a mismanagement of objectives. In terms of seemingly easy jobs like opening bins, we nonetheless don’t know the reason why I’d need to use a pickaxe to start a tiny wood package or breaking into a nearly broken fissure in wall surface (both containing a quest items inside), maybe not whenever I could logically utilize my fists, a steel saw, a rock, a blade, a log, or just about any other wide range of sufficiently sharp or dull items within my stock. The overall game just doesn’t want one to get it done.

SEE ALSO

Zotac Has an Untethered VR PC Solution for HTC Vive and Oculus Rift

Exactly the same goes for stock. The reason why can’t we place a chart during my stock that is not any larger than any item that’s currently in there? Once more, the game wants one to realize the chart is unimportant to advance development. But that ought to be something I decide, perhaps not the video game.

Convenience

Unearthed Inc relies on a sort of point-and-click teleport system that just gives you extremely certain nodes, something similar to Cyan’s VR-capable puzzler Obduction (2016). This is true about 99 percent of the time, rendering it an ultimately comfortable experience—all except a fast-paced my own cart ride half way through that’s pretty nausea-inducing.

unearthed-rock

At moments your actual POV is lurchingly shifted near you so you can see an Indian Jones-esque boulder arrive tumbling down after, a locomotion no-no that Oculus suggests against in their Best Methods Guide. Nevertheless, the complete scene thought disorienting and a little too ‘bottom associated with the VR barrel’ for my tastes, a pity thinking about exactly how competent the remainder of online game presents itself.

This informative article passed through the Full-Text RSS solution – should this be your articles therefore’re reading it on another person’s website, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Totally False.

Published at Fri, 30 Dec 2016 17:39:08 +0000

UploadVR’s 2016 CES Party Brings All The VR Goodness To Vegas

UploadVR’s 2016 CES Party Brings All The VR Goodness To Vegas

2016 was rough. A gorilla died, trolls ruled the earth, and we lost more than our fair share of icons and legends. But, thankfully, every year eventually comes to a close and as this one prepares to wind up we can turn our attention to the bright (slightly denial-fueled) promise of 2017 — and it’s kicking off with a bang for VR.

CES is upon us and as long as you’re not a journalist preparing to cover it (hold on, let me pop my fourth Xanax of the day) this gargantuan show should be a non-stop thrill ride. To celebrate the huge VR milestones of 2016, and to usher in what looks to be an even bigger year for our industry coming up next, UploadVR is throwing our biggest party yet right in the heart of the Las Vegas Strip.

Thanks to our friends at Audi, we’ll be taking over the two top floors of the world famous Palms resort hotel. The main event kicks off on Friday, January 6th at 10PM PST. This will include:

  • Over 20 VR demo experiences across the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, PS VR, Samsung Gear VR, and Daydream by Google
  • 2 Floors at the top of The Palms Fantasy Tower: The View and The Moon
  • Network with VR/AR Industry Influencers, Executives, and Investors
  • Interactive Art Installations
  • Opening Live Musical Performance by Lapa (Ilya Goldberg) followed by a celebrity DJ in The View (Full lineup announced Jan 2nd)
  • House DJ Set by SUBPAC in The Moon
  • The Fourth Transformation Book Signing with Robert Scoble and Shel Israel
  • Mixed Reality Studio with an Audi VR Experience

There will also be an early-bird VIP mixer from 8PM-10PM. Attendees there will get to enjoy:

  • Early access to event to mingle with VR/AR Executives, Influencers, and Investors
  • Open Bar
  • Exclusive first look at VR demos and activations
  • Presentation by Upload and Audi at 9PM

In addition to all of this, we’re also going to be giving away some of the hottest VR gear in the world to a few lucky participants. Guests who tweet #UploadParty during the event, or share a photo from the photo booth, will be entered for a chance to win:

  • An NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Graphics Card
  • Helix Cuff wireless headphones form Ashley Chloe
  • An HTC Vive VR headset

Tickets are on sale now for both the VIP mixer and the main event! So stop on by, enjoy an amazing evening and lets make 2017 a year to remember!

Tagged with: , , , ,

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Fri, 30 Dec 2016 22:54:14 +0000